Principal’s Pen: Rich at Christmas

rectorc“For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you through his poverty might become rich”
(2 Corinthians 8:9).

By nature, humans are not giving. Often, we keep for ourselves what we have. The first words of many children—“no” and “mine”—easily fly out especially during fits of self-centeredness.

Each year, the media reports on Christmas spending. For 2018, the average American supposedly spent $1,000 for Christmas gifts, decorations, food, and related non-gift items. Perhaps these reports amaze us—considering that we are not, by nature, giving.

At Christmas, however, we all would do well to ponder Paul’s words to the Corinthians, noting Christ’s giving nature and his reason for it.

Paul reminds us of Jesus’ grace, God’s unconditional gift. It is “unasked, unforced, unearned” (Where Shepherds Lately Knelt, stanza 4). “The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ” is God’s gift to all sinners.

B15year31ecPaul then illustrates grace. “That though [Christ] was rich, yet for your sake he became poor” (2 Corinthians 8:9) Christ set aside heaven’s glories to become human. Although he is true God, Jesus took “the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness” [Philippians 2:7]. He experienced pain, sorrow, and temptation firsthand. Yet, through it all, “he committed no sin, and no deceit was found in his mouth” [1 Peter 2:22].

His reason for doing this was “so that you through his poverty might become rich.” Jesus lived to save sinners. Earlier in Corinthians, Paul states how Christ bore the world’s sin on the cross “so that in him we might become the righteousness of God” (2 Corinthians 5:21). Unlike anyone else could, Christ humbled himself to offer forgiveness, peace, and eternal life—the most precious Christmas gifts of all.

There is nothing wrong with giving Christmas gifts. It is great to see Christmas decorations. Celebrating Christmas with family and friends can be joyful. But, for us, these simply point to the One who surrendered his riches “so that [we] through his poverty might become rich.”

God bless your Advent meditations and your joyous Christmas celebration.
May he also bless your New Year.

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran High. Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Students recognized by MTU’s Society of Women Engineers

 

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Lakeside Lutheran High school juniors Evelyn Schauer (left), Watertown, and Mia Murray, Middleton, were each awarded a Certificate of Merit from Michigan Technological University’s section of the Society of Women Engineers. The Certificate of Merit Program recognizes young women in their sophomore or junior year of high school based on academic excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics courses. In past years MTU has recognized 400 remarkable young women across Michigan and Wisconsin with the goal of spurring these students to achieve their full potential in careers as engineers and leaders, as well as expand the image of the engineering profession as a positive force in diversity, improving the quality of life, and demonstrating the value of life-long learning.

Using nationally established Project Lead the Way© (PLTW) engineering curriculum, Lakeside Lutheran High School offers a STEM Academy—a special program for students interested in taking engineering or biomedical sciences in their post-secondary education. LLHS is also one of the first in the state of Wisconsin to offer a SWE chapter at the high school level.  For more information, contact STEM Academy Director Andrew Willems at (920) 648-2321.