Principal’s Pen: I don’t deserve this

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Someone—feeling that life is unfair—may say or think these words. Christians could also utter them. However, by faith, they convey a completely different meaning.

Jesus and his disciples left Judea for Galilee. Unlike their countrymen, they traveled through Samaria. Eventually, they arrived at Sychar, the location of Jacob’s well. Jesus sent his disciples to town to buy food while he waited at the well.

A Samaritan woman came to draw water. Jesus asked her for a drink. Immediately, her defenses went up. “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” (John 4:9). She knew that Jews did not associate with Samaritans or even share their cups. However, Jesus would not be dissuaded. He said, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water” (v. 10).

water4cThis woman did not realize that the long-awaited Messiah sat before her. After further conversation, Jesus revealed, “I am he” (v. 26). This woman did not deserve this. Jesus could have avoided Samaria. He could have said nothing when she approached the well. He could have ended the conversation after her rebuttal. Yet, by grace, he revealed himself to her as well as to “many of the Samaritans from that town [who] believed in him because of the woman’s testimony” (v. 39).

Those in Sychar did not deserve this. Neither do we.

We are “enemies of God” (Hebrews 10:27) through unbelief. We have “turned from following him and [have] no regard for any of his ways” (Job 34:27). This alone is grounds for God’s rejection.

Yet, by grace, he reveals Christ to us through his Word. Scripture provides the gospel’s “living water” (John 4:10) to identify Jesus as “that Messiah called Christ … [who] will explain everything” (v. 25).

“I don’t deserve this!” No. It should be, “I don’t deserve this”—“the incomparable riches of [God’s] grace, expressed in his kindness to us in Christ Jesus” (Eph 2:7).

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

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Warrior Band parades award home from Cherry Festival

The Lakeside Lutheran Warrior Band experienced another successful summer, marching in seven Wisconsin and three Michigan parades, and was awarded first place at the National Cherry Royale Parade.

The season culminated with a four-day trip July 3-6 to Traverse City, Michigan, home of the annual National Cherry Festival. While there, the band marched in the Boyne City, Mich., Fourth of July Festival Parade, described by Good Morning America and USA Today as “Top 10 Independence Day Celebrations in the Nation,” according to publicity materials. Later that evening they performed in the exhibition Junior Royale Parade in Traverse City. Saturday morning saw the band perform in the Cherry Royale Parade, in which the Warrior Band scored the highest among all bands, scoring 93/100 points, and took first place in its class. Band members enjoyed the rest of their tour in activities that included river tubing, hiking dunes, laser tag, crossing Lake Michigan on the S.S. Badger ferry and more.

The summer season also included June parades in Wisconsin cities including Brillion, Appleton, Mt. Horeb, Mukwonago, Oregon, Lake Mills and Sun Prairie. Photos from the parades can be viewed and downloaded at llhs.smugmug.com/School/Summer-Band-2019

The Lakeside Lutheran Warrior Band is classified as a “marching” or “parade” band, as opposed to a “show” band that would emphasize field displays. Marching bands such as Lakeside’s incorporate complex choreography performed right on the street during parades. This year’s parade songs included the well-known and challenging “Emperata Overture” by Claude T. Smith and an excerpt from “Chorale and Shaker Dance” by John Zdechlik.

The band is already preparing for its major trip next summer to participate in the Calgary Stampede in Alberta, Canada. The two-week travel schedule historically centers around parades in the Mt. Rushmore area as well as multiple Stampede events, including the kick-off parade on July 3, 2020, where more than 250,000 people fill the 2.5-mile route in downtown Calgary, and also includes several opportunities for band members to experience sights such as the Badlands, Banff National Park and the Columbia Icefield Chalet and Glacier

For more information about the Lakeside Lutheran Warrior Band, contact Director Glen Pufahl at gpufahl@llhs.org or 920-648-2321. The band welcomes interest from serious musicians grades 8-12 from the community as well as from within its own school band program.

Warrior Stories: Hannah Willems

Lakeside has given me the opportunity to express my love for Jesus by using the talents he has given me. Whether that be through song or athletics, Lakeside helped me learn many different things. I have been a three-sport athlete in volleyball, basketball and soccer, as well as a member of the band and A Cappella choir. The atmosphere is lively with so many activities and clubs to participate in that help students stay connected with friends and the Lakeside community.

Relationships built with teachers also make a big impact. One teacher and coach in particular for me was Mrs. Krauklis, my volleyball coach for two years. She always brings out the best in me whether I am on the court or in the classroom, encouraging and supporting and trying to get me to fulfill my potential. I will certainly miss her a ton and definitely will keep in touch if I ever need advice. Another is Mr. Vanderhoof. Although here only a year so far, he already has a huge heart for his students, always checking in to make sure everything is going well and if it’s not, he was there to listen or even get me on the right path. I am so thankful to have come to know these two teachers.

Lakeside has blessed my four years with amazing friendships and awesome memories that I will never forget. I’m fully equipped to move on to my next chapter in life at Martin Luther College and share my love for Jesus through teaching. Thank you so much, Lakeside.

(Left) Hannah, daughter of Andrew and Heidi, is a member at Bethany, Fort Atkinson. In May, she joined the ranks of her Forever Warrior siblings, including Luke (‘17), Aaron (‘12) and Sara (‘11, MLC ‘16). Brother Noah is a Shoreland Lutheran grad (‘15).

(Top right) Coach Krauklis captured a selfie with Hannah and two other senior volleyball players.

(Bottom right) In her second year in A Cappella Choir, Hannah and the choir traveled to 20 area churches as well as to California over spring break to lead in song worship.

Principal’s Pen: Bad news, good news

It’s going to get worse before it gets better.

John authored Revelation while exiled on Patmos. It was a dangerous time for Christians. Most faced persecution. Many were imprisoned. Some were being tortured and killed.

John’s Spirit-inspired book accurately depicted his world. The Christian Church was under attack. It appeared that evil would soon gain the upper hand.

Repeatedly, John urged the saints to be faithful to God during this tribulation.

But, it would get worse before it got better. He cautioned, “Do not be afraid of what you are about to suffer. I tell you, the devil will put some of you in prison to test you, and you will suffer persecution” [Revelation 2:10a]. But, immediately, he exhorted, “Be faithful, even to the point of death, and I will give you life as your victor’s crown” [v.10b]. There was hope. Even if death was imminent, the Lord promised the “victor’s crown” to all who persevered.

The Lord of the Church would not desert the faithful. Eventually, the institutions seeking to destroy Christianity would themselves end. No longer would the saints be persecuted, and the Church would actually become society’s foundation.

Today, Christianity is again under attack. But, unlike John’s time, the attack is not necessarily physical. Today’s attack seeks to undermine the Church through fear and apathy. We feel alone and isolated because Scripture’s views are no longer valued by society. At times, we are lulled into complacency thinking that attacks on Christians are distant, sporadic, and without effect.

In reality, those attacks are drawing closer and intensifying. Christians are identified in politics, the media, and entertainment as intolerant hatemongers. Some view us as the troublers of society for defending Scripture’s truths on life, marriage, and sexuality.

We would all do well to read John’s words and remind ourselves that we, too, live in a perilous age. At the same time, we can find comfort in God’s Word. Even if persecution and death threaten us, God promises, “I will give you life as your victor’s crown.”

May God give us a strong faith to clings to him for he promises us “the victor’s crown.”

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Warrior focus: Seth Hackbarth

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Lakeside has had a big impact on me these last four years. I have been encouraged athletically and academically.

But, the best part of Lakeside is the Christian education we are offered. We get to have a devotion daily to strengthen our faith. We are reminded how blessed we are every day with the gifts God has given us—giving us a reason to work hard.

I like that Lakeside teachers expect a lot out of their students as well as their players. In the academic field they push us to our limits. The teachers help us with our future and they want us to succeed. They also push us in our athletic abilities. They know what we are capable of and teach us to work hard.

Seth, son of Todd and Donna, is a member of St. Paul in Lake Mills. He received his diploma May 26 along with 109 others in the LLHS Class of 2019. He was the last in his immediate family to join the ranks of his Forever Warrior siblings, including Hannah (‘11, MLC ‘15), Sarah (Hackbarth ‘13) Schroeder (MLC ‘17), Moriah (‘15) and Abigail (‘17). Seth plans to pursue pastoral studies at Martin Luther College this fall.

Seth, in addition to playing soccer in fall and track in spring, was a player on the 2019 conference champion basketball team. Being the youngest in his family, his basketball parents night (right) this past winter was—for his parents—the final one after 12 consecutive years!

Basketball camp medalists recognized

Lakeside Lutheran High School recently held its annual Warrior girls basketball camps for grades 4 to 9. On the last day of the four-day camps, several 6th -9th-grade players were recognized by the coaches for outstanding skills and positive attitudes.

GBB-67campAwards-19The following girls in grades six and seven were recognized: back row, L-R: Back row: Avery Buchta, Ixonia (All-Camp Award); Ava Ohm, West St Paul, MN (Hot Shot Award); Ella Schuetz, Lake Mills (All-Camp); Sinai Palacios, Watertown (All-Camp). Middle row, L-R: Ashley Rosenau, Oconomowoc (All-Camp); Kyleigh Detert, Waterloo (Assist Award); Ella Lauber, Lake Mills (Defense Award); Kathryn Schulz, Beaver Dam (Warrior Award). Front, L-R: Mara Skalitzky, Waterloo (Ball Handler Award); Aquila Palacios, Watertown (All-Camp).

GBB-89campAwards-19Several in grades eight and nine also received awards: back row, L-R: Grace Cody, Juneau (All-Camp Award); Reyna Rupnow, Oconomowoc (All-Camp); Ava Heckmann, Middleton (All Camp); Abigail Minning, Watertown (Ball Handler Award). Middle row, L-R: Nora Larson, Columbus (Hot Shot Award). Grace Plitzuweit, Oconomowoc (All-Camp); Averi Wolfram, Madison (Defense Award). Front: Caitlin Weiland, Columbus (Warrior Award); Jenna Shadoski, Janesville (All-Camp); Olivia Bartels, Lake Mills (Assist Leader).

Lakeside Lutheran High School also hosts elementary-level summer sports camps for boys basketball, co-ed soccer, distance running and golf, boys non-padded football, and girls volleyball. The school also hosts a STEM camp in late July. Call the school at 920-648-2321 for more information, or visit the school website at http://www.llhs.org/K8sports.

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Lakeside students win German awards

Lakeside Lutheran participated in the annual AATG (American Association for the Teachers of German) state-wide test, which is co-sponsored by the DSSV (German Language and School Society, Inc.) of Milwaukee.  

Of the 13 students who took the listening comprehension and reading test, 7 received special recognition. Students participated in the Level 2, 3 and 4 tests. Their performance is judged by how they performed in comparison to their peers in the state of Wisconsin (percentile rank).

Receiving mention in the “Achievement Level” (scoring in the 50-69th percentile rank) were: Olivia Odrich, Cooper Clark, Jack Egelseer in level 2; Oliver Butler and Dinesh Tadepalli in level 3.  “Bronze Achievement” (scoring in the 70-79th percentile rank) went to Emily Meiller at Level 2; “Silver Achievement” (scoring in the 81-90th percentile rank) went to 4 students, Henry Raemisch and Brendan McKenna at level 2, Isabella Collins at level 3 and Noelle Gates at Level 4.  

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Noelle Gates (89th percentile rank) and Brendan McKenna (88th percentile rank) were awarded cash prizes by the DSSV (German Language and School Society, Inc.) of Milwaukee.  This was the 64th annual test sponsored by AATG and DSSV.