Principal’s Pen: Dear Problem…

“Dear God – my problem is so great that…” You fill in the rest.

The prophet Elijah faced such a problem. After witnessing the Lord’s power on Mount Carmel, and as the people’s cry – “The Lord – he is God!” (1 Kings 18:39) – rung in his ears, he may have assumed that his problems with idolatry had ended.

Then came Jezebel’s words: “May the gods deal with me…if…I do not make your life like that of one of [my dead prophets]” (19:2). Elijah fled. To him, his problem was bigger than God. He saw escape as the only solution.

It is here that the Lord provided Elijah with a valuable lesson. God sent powerful displays – wind, earthquake, and fire. But he was not in them.

Finally, Elijah heard a whisper: “What are you doing here, Elijah?” (19:13). God was in that whisper. After Elijah explained himself, the Lord explained his plan. Elijah still had work to do. He would anoint two kings and he would also anoint his successor. Energized by the word of the Lord, Elijah carried out the plan. He learned that even his greatest problem was under the Lord’s control.

1cr1013cWe have been like Elijah many times. When we face seemingly impossible situations, we often despair and search for solutions anywhere else but with God.

At times like these, we need the Lord’s assurance. “When you pass through the waters, I will be with you…. When you walk through the fire, you will not be burned” (Isaiah 43:2). And again, “God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out” (1 Corinthians 10:13).

God repeatedly assures us that he manages even our greatest problems.

Instead of praying, “Dear God – my problem is so great that…,” we may confidently pray, “Dear problem – my God is so great that….” You fill in the rest!

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

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Principal’s Pen: Ascension matters

Jesus’ Ascension truly matters.

Other church festivals seem to overshadow Ascension. However, Jesus’ ascension is a major event in his life and work.

When Jesus ascended, he sat at his heavenly Father’s right hand, a place of honor, trust, and position. By this, God the Father verified that Christ had made the final payment for sin by the “one sacrifice [that] has made perfect forever those who are being made holy” [Hebrews 10:13-14].

18-05FedConWhen Jesus ascended, his intercessory work began. Through him, all believers have “an advocate with the Father” [1 John 2:1]. Daily, he pleads for us at his Father’s throne.

When Jesus ascended, his eternal reign began. In heaven, he reigns “with angels, authorities, and powers subject to him” (1 Peter 3:22). No one and nothing can equal him or challenge him.

Lastly, when Jesus ascended, the Church was energized and strengthened for its mission. “And God placed all things under [Jesus’] feet and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every way” [Ephesians 1:22- 23]. As the Church’s head, all things are done through Christ.

Years ago, Ascension was a highly regarded festival. For that matter, it still is.

Jesus’ Ascension truly matters!

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran High. Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Principal’s Pen: Are you sure?

Do we know — for sure?

Job may well be one of the oldest Bible books. It raises an age-old question:
Do we know — for sure?

Throughout Job, he made pointed statements. “But a man dies and is laid low; he breathes his last and is no more.” [Job 14:10]. He also asked tough questions. “If a man die, shall he live again?” [Job 14:14].

redeemer_16912cHis thoughts came from a heart that suffered great personal loss. Yet, by faith, he also exclaimed, “I know that my redeemer lives” [Job 19:25]. Job knew this — for sure. With these words, he stood on solid ground. In spite of his troubles, the Holy Spirit led him to speak comfort and assurance to all believers.

Job begins, “I know.” He pointed with certainty to a central truth of Scripture: his “redeemer lives.” Christ is true God. He controls everything. He lives and has conquered death. Paul echoed the same thought: Christ “was appointed the Son of God in power by his resurrection from the dead: Jesus Christ [is] our Lord” [Romans 1:4].

Like Job, we, too, may know and believe that our Redeemer lives in spite of our troubles and doubts. This is God’s plan for us. This is why the Bible was written. The Apostle John agrees. “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life” [1 John 5:13].

Through God’s Word, we know — for sure!

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran High.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Lakeside Lutheran High School begins 60th year

Lakeside Lutheran High School opened its doors to incoming freshmen on Wednesday, August 16, 2017, marking the beginning the school’s 60th year. Freshmen begin their school year a day early to get a chance to learn their schedules, meet other incoming freshmen and explore co-curricular opportunities. Classes begin for all students on Thursday, August 17 with an enrollment of 415 students, a 4% increase since the end of the 2016-17 school year.

The Opening Service and installation of new faculty take place as part of the first day’s events on August 17 at 10 a.m. in the west gymnasium. Pastor Matthew DeNoyer from Bethany Evangelical Lutheran Church in Fort Atkinson will offer the devotion during this special chapel service. Liturgist for the opening service will be Pastor Clark Schultz from the Lakeside Lutheran faculty. The community is invited to attend.

New faculty to be installed include Mr. Phil Dretske, instructor in Mathematics and Religion, as well as football and baseball coach. A 2002 graduate of Martin Luther College (MLC), he and his family live in Madison where he previously taught at Eastside Lutheran School.

Also being installed as a full-time Physical Education instructor is Mrs. Jennifer Krauklis, who served in an adjunct position at Lakeside Lutheran in the Mathematics and Science departments in 2016-17, and has been the Warrior varsity volleyball coach for several years. A 1998 graduate of Lakeside herself, she attended MLC and graduated with an Education degree from Wisconsin Lutheran College in Milwaukee, where she is currently pursuing a graduate degree in Educational Leadership. She and her family live in Lake Mills.

 

SONY DSC
Lakeside Lutheran faculty number 33 for the 2017-18 school year, including back row, from left: Pastor Don Schultz, Assistant Principal, Religion; Andrew Willems, Technology Director, Computer Science; Jim Bauer, PhyEd, Math; Jim Buege, Director of Choirs, English; Tim Matthies, Math; Matt Doering, Social Studies. Second row from top, L-R: Dan Kuehl, Director of Instruction, English; Pastor Mark Toepel, World Languages; Darice Brumm, Extended Learning Aide; Jeff Meske, Career and Technical Education; Ruth Hirschfeld, Director of Extended Learning; Paul Bauer, Science, Math. Middle row, L-R: Phyllis Huska, Librarian; Damon Tracy, Science; Phil Dretske, Math, Religion; Steve Lauber, Director of Admissions, English; Andy Rosenau, Guidance Director, Computer Science; Kirk DeNoyer, Activities Director, PhyEd. 2nd row up, L-R: Pastor Clark Schultz, Religion; Jodie Schommer, English; Jenny Krauklis, PhyEd; Lori Tetzlaff, Art; Lance Johnson, Science; Pastor Caleb Davisson, Religion. Front row, from left: Todd Hackbarth, Math; Andy Asmus, Social Studies; James Grasby, Principal, Health; Nathan Koerber, World Languages; Cameron Ausen, Social Studies, Religion; Sandi Corlett, FACS, Health. Missing are Gerry Walta, World Languages; Glen Pufahl, Director of Bands, English; and Jayne Meske, Extended Learning Aide.

 

Principal’s Pen: Attitude Adjustment

“He really has an attitude!”

Attitude is often descriptive of negative or disagreeable people. “Attitude” exists for different reasons. It may be teenage rebellion. It might be passive-aggressive behavior in the workplace. It could even be someone’s despondency in life.

Regardless of cause, this type of attitude counters that of our Savior’s. Paul wrote, “In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus” [Philippians 2:5]. (Some Bible translations use attitude for mindset.)

Christ’s attitude is perfect. He thought it nothing to be “in very nature God.” [2:6]  Yet, he set aside his godliness to be “made in human likeness” [2:7]. Then, he “humbled himself…to death…on a cross” [2:8]. Christ’s attitude is more than a goal for Christians. It should be our lifestyle! When we emulate Christ’s attitude in word, thought, and action, we do so joyfully thanking the One who gave himself as “the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and…also for the sins of the whole world” [1 John 2:2].

servant-attitudeChristians should have an attitude. First, it should be a confident attitude believing that our Savior won full and free forgiveness for us sinners. Secondly, it should be a trusting attitude knowing of Jesus’ personal love for us. Finally, it should be a responding attitude seeking ways to serve God and others in Christlike humility.

When seen this way, it’s not wrong for Christians to have an “attitude.”

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 x2204 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Principal’s Pen: Identity theft-proof

Identity theft is the world’s fastest growing crime. Government websites, online financial records, and other secure databases are vulnerable. In the hands of identity thieves, stolen personal information can be used to apply for loans, credit cards, and government benefits. Identity theft is serious. Last year, it cost Americans $16 billion!

Before the world experienced this type of identity theft, a different kind occurred. More destructive and far-reaching than cyber theft, this identity theft affects every human. Tragically, its effects are eternal.

snake_15215cThis identity theft first occurred in the Garden of Eden when Satan stole God’s holy image from humans. Satan convinced the first man and woman that God was holding back from them. His line, “Did God really say,” (Genesis 3:1) drove a sinful wedge between God and humankind. The once perfect knowledge of God and his holy will was eternally gone—stolen by Satan. With this loss, the joy of serving God was gone. Life would now be a daily scenario of sinful, self-survival with no hope of self-rescue or self-renewal.

God, however, would not allow it to end this way. He intervened and promised restoration through his Son’s perfect life, innocent suffering, and death. Through faith in Christ, all believers would enjoy holiness and righteousness. God the Father even declared his approval for his Son’s perfect atonement by raising him from the dead.

Christ’s resurrection at Easter foreshadows our resurrection. His resurrection is God’s sure sign to all believers that our identity as God’s children is fully restored. Jesus paid this cost to reestablish us as “fellow citizens with God’s people and also members of his household” (Ephesians 2:19). This is Easter’s promise.

No one can steal it from us—ever!

Mr. Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 x2204 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Principal’s Pen: Seeing Absolutely

vision_7600cIt’s said that beauty is in the “eye of the beholder.” Since one’s view is relative, what he considers beautiful, good, or right is often his opinion.

This is the world’s thinking. It believes that beauty or right are found in anything if it doesn’t undermine something else. There are no absolutes. After all, it’s in the “eye of the beholder.”

Christians know and follow the absolutes of God’s Word. They know relative truth is wrong. When they express God’s unchanging views, the world labels them and their words as judgmental, cliquey, or intolerant. The world tells them that right and wrong vary by location, time, and situation. After all, it’s in the “eye of the beholder.”

Before his crucifixion, Jesus prepared his disciples for his death. He said, “Very truly I tell you, you will weep and mourn while the world rejoices” (John 16:20).

Indeed, the world would celebrate Jesus’ death. His teachings countered the prevailing thoughts of his day. His foes would not accept or tolerate what he identified as sinful. Therefore, they viewed his arrest, torture, and murder as the right thing. To them, “he had no beauty or majesty” (Isaiah 53:2). To them, he was wrong.

But, Jesus pointed his disciples past that dark time when their “grief [would] turn to joy” (John 16:20). His death produced life when he victoriously rose. Joy would come to all who behold him as their Savior by faith.

Are things really in the “eye of the beholder?” Certainly, views on earthly matters are sometimes relative since the beholder determines their value.

However, Christians view all things by faith through God’s Word. Right and wrong are absolutes. Through Christ, our eyes behold the truth. Through Christ, we see light, life, and salvation.

Mr. Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 x2204 or jgrasby@llhs.org