Principal’s Pen: Take a breath

principal note_19131cWhat is the most useful chapter in the Bible? Some may feel that Genesis 1 (Creation), Psalm 23 (the Good Shepherd), 1 Corinthians 15 (Resurrection), or Revelation 22 (the Bible’s final words) deserve that title. Yet, there is a case that Romans 8 may well earn that distinction. Living in an unsettled world, this chapter bears a timely message: “Take a breath. God says that it will be okay.”

Romans 8 contains several well-known verses.

  • There is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. (v. 1)
  • I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us. (v. 18)
  • If God is for us, who can be against us? (v. 31)

Each one clearly states that God is in control. Nothing can separate us from his love.
The past five months have been difficult for everyone. I do not wish to minimize the impact that disease, the loss of livelihood, and restrictions on travel and socializing have had on people. Nor do I claim that there is no inequality in the world. Yet, if you look at all that has recently happened through the lens of Romans 8, you begin to understand that what God does is for our good and it will continue to be for our good even in trying times.

Have you considered the new opportunities for the gospel since mid-March? An avalanche of technology through streaming, YouTube and other social media has shared the saving message of Jesus with a figuratively captive audience. The seed of the Word has been planted. The Holy Spirit will cause it to grow as he sees fit.

Have you considered the new opportunities for personal spiritual growth? Once busy schedules are not as busy. There is more time to read God’s Word, meditate on it, and pray.

Have you considered the new opportunities for godly living? Social isolation creates loneliness. This is a great time to reach out and check on others—especially those who have no one checking on them.

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Romans 8 closes, “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

“Take a breath. God says that it will be okay.”

Lord, help us to “take a breath” knowing that you are in control.  Amen.

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Principal’s Pen: Why always thankful?

frame_17970cEveryone has days on which everything seemingly goes wrong. Despite such days, you may always thank God.

Consider that…

  • You have life. God specially designed the time and location in which you live. He has specific plans for you to come to faith, to serve him and others, and to share “the reason for the hope that you have” (1 Peter 3:15). This is life’s true meaning.
  • You are never alone. In an impersonal, uncaring world, God is your closest friend, supporter and confidante. David declares, “You know when I sit and when I rise; you perceive my thoughts from afar. You discern my going out and my lying down; you are familiar with all my ways” (Psalm 139:2-3).
  • You can rejoice in tribulation. No one—not even believers—escapes suffering. Sin affects us all. Yet, James tells you, “Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds” (James 1:2). Others see problems as burdens. You may view them as God’s training for future glory.
  • God loves you incredibly. In spite of your sin, he displayed the world’s greatest act of love by giving his Son to be your Savior. “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).
  • Your future is certain. Through Christ, heaven is yours. No one can take it. “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:38-39).

With all this in mind, you can give thanks even on your worst days.

God bless your Thanksgiving.

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran High.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or grasby@llhs.org

Lakeside Lutheran graduates 93

Lakeside Lutheran High School presented diplomas to 93 graduating seniors on Sunday, May 28, at 2 p.m. in the east gymnasium.

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Pastor Bernt Tweit from Holy Cross Lutheran Church in Madison, father of graduate Benjamin Tweit, served as liturgist for the service. Graduation speaker was Pastor Caleb Davisson from the Lakeside Lutheran faculty. Organist was Mr. Peter Schaewe from St. John, Jefferson. Class valedictorian is Caleb Strutz, son of Pastor Nathan and Beth Strutz, Verona, and salutatorian is Danielle Schilling, daughter of Mike and Robin Schilling, Watertown. Mr. Scott Schneider, Chairman of the Board of Regents, along with Principal James Grasby, presented diplomas to the graduates.

The class verse is Romans 8:38-39: “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” The class hymn is “Speak, O Lord.” Class colors are lilac and silver, and the class flower is a rose.