Principal’s Pen: Why always thankful?

frame_17970cEveryone has days on which everything seemingly goes wrong. Despite such days, you may always thank God.

Consider that…

  • You have life. God specially designed the time and location in which you live. He has specific plans for you to come to faith, to serve him and others, and to share “the reason for the hope that you have” (1 Peter 3:15). This is life’s true meaning.
  • You are never alone. In an impersonal, uncaring world, God is your closest friend, supporter and confidante. David declares, “You know when I sit and when I rise; you perceive my thoughts from afar. You discern my going out and my lying down; you are familiar with all my ways” (Psalm 139:2-3).
  • You can rejoice in tribulation. No one—not even believers—escapes suffering. Sin affects us all. Yet, James tells you, “Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds” (James 1:2). Others see problems as burdens. You may view them as God’s training for future glory.
  • God loves you incredibly. In spite of your sin, he displayed the world’s greatest act of love by giving his Son to be your Savior. “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).
  • Your future is certain. Through Christ, heaven is yours. No one can take it. “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:38-39).

With all this in mind, you can give thanks even on your worst days.

God bless your Thanksgiving.

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran High.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or grasby@llhs.org

Principal’s Pen: A model for thanksgiving

He is mentioned in only one chapter of the Bible. Even then, he is overshadowed by the Christchild.

Luke reports, “Now there was a man in Jerusalem called Simeon, who was righteous and devout. It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before he had seen the Lord’s Messiah” [Luke 2:25-26].

Simeon is described as “righteous and devout.” As such, he knew Scripture. He knew God’s anointed would be David’s descendent [2 Samuel 7], yet even greater than David [Psalm 110]. He knew the Chosen One would born of a virgin [Isaiah 7:14] in Bethlehem [Micah 5:2]. He knew a forerunner would precede God’s Promised One [Isaiah 40] and that the Savior himself would be a prophet like Moses [Deuteronomy 18]. He knew the Messiah would be forsaken and pierced [Psalm 22] and then rise from death [Psalm 16].

Simeon knew all this about his Savior.

nunc-dimittusImagine Simeon’s joy as he held Jesus and exclaimed, “Sovereign Lord, as you have promised, you may now dismiss your servant in peace. For my eyes have seen your salvation” [Luke 2:29-30]. His joy was complete. He offered thanks to God that the
age-old promise of a Savior was fulfilled.

Simeon’s thanksgiving to God can also be our model for thanksgiving. He waited his entire life for the fulfillment of the promise of a Savior from sin. We share that same faith—only we don’t wait and wonder when it will happen. It has! God sent his Son to be our Savior so that all believers may have joy and thanksgiving.

At Thanksgiving, we tend to focus on God’s physical blessings. That’s good because God richly blesses us. Yet, we should also include his spiritual blessings in our Thanksgiving because they will last forever.

Like Simeon, may God “dismiss [us] in peace” knowing that his greatest blessing—a Savior—is ours every day by faith.

Have a blessed Thanksgiving!

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Principal’s Pen: What are you giving thanks for?

Thanks be to God!The fourth Thursday in November is America’s national day of Thanksgiving. To many, it is the kickoff to Christmas shopping. To others, it is family and feasting. Many look forward to parades and football.

Although America’s Thanksgiving does not have distinctly religious roots, Christians can only see the possibilities.

The lesson of the Ten Lepers is often read on Thanksgiving. In it, we find earthly and heavenly meanings. It provides reasons to thank God.

First, like the lepers were without hope, we can only admit our lost state due to sin. Theirs was an incurable physical disease. We face eternal death. We are born with sin, we live in it, and – without God’s intervention – we will forever die in it. Just as the lepers thanked Jesus for physical healing, you and I can thank God for spiritual healing through his Son.

Secondly, Jesus’ healing brought the lepers physical blessings: extension of their lives and the right to return home. Every day, God blesses us physically with “clothing, shoes, food, drink, house, [and] home.” The depth of our blessings is far beyond what we need and can use. We can thank God for these physical blessings.

Most importantly, our greatest blessing is identified through the returning leper’s words and actions. He knew and believed that the one who physically healed him was the One who also brought him spiritual healing. The evangelist notes that this leper—a Samaritan—“came back, praising God…[and] threw himself at Jesus’ feet” (Luke 17:16). Why? That is found in Jesus’ words, “Your faith has made you well” (v. 17). This man’s physical healing was an act of Jesus’ mercy. His spiritual healing—and ours—is God’s gift through faith in Jesus.

Being thankful is always appropriate. The Bible commands, “Give thanks in all circumstances” (1 Thessalonians 5:18).

As Christians, let us always thank God for our salvation through Jesus.
God bless your Thanksgiving!

Mr. Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran. Reach him at 920.648.2321 x2204 or jgrasby@llhs.org

School-wide Food Drive on ’til Thanksgiving

​In the spirit of Thanksgiving, LLHS Teens for Christ is sponsoring a school-wide food drive for a local food pantry. Each class is asked for certain food items, although any donations are encouraged. Check posters around school and in the cafeteria to see what food is requested or see poster below. Collection boxes are located in the cafeteria. Bring food anytime between now and the Wednesday before Thanksgiving break.

Bring items to boxes LLHS cafeteria by Wednesday, November 25, 2015.
Bring items to boxes LLHS cafeteria by Wednesday, November 25, 2015.