Principal’s Pen: Warrior=Witness


The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands. Day after day they pour forth speech; night after night they reveal knowledge. They have no speech, they use no words; no sound is heard from them. Yet their voice goes out into all the earth. [Psalm 19:1-4]


As many reflect on summer travels, they may recall thundering waterfalls, rushing pen_8416crivers, picturesque lakes, towering mountains, and wildlife. Without realizing it, they have witnessed something far greater.

In Romans, Paul explains the “natural knowledge of God.” He states how creation clearly testifies of God’s presence and power. He writes, “For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities – his eternal power and divine nature – have been clearly seen” [1:20]. Nature testifies that there is a God with power to create and regulate all things. Everyone can see this. However, few acknowledge it.

Paul continues, “For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became … darkened” [v. 21]. In spite of the evidence, most choose to ignore God. In short, they “become fools” [v. 22]. They seek God where he is not—in themselves and in ways they devise.

We have a formidable task. We must tell the world Scripture’s message of our God and his great love for humankind. His love is so profound that he sacrificed his only and only Son for everyone’s sin. “For God did not send his Son into the world to be its judge, but to be its [S]avior” [John 3:16 Good News].

Lakeside’s biennial theme is Witness. In chapel, devotions, and in all classes, students A17year46pcwill be encouraged to witness—encouraged to witness to one another to remain strong in the faith and encouraged to witness to those who see God’s signs in nature, yet do not know his complete message as revealed in his Word.

Indeed,
“the heavens declare the glory of God.”

Lord, give us a desire to witness so that others may know you and trust in your Son as their Savior.

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

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New school year ready to begin

Lakeside Lutheran High School will open its doors to incoming freshmen on Friday, August 16. Freshmen begin their school year a day early to orient and learn schedules, meet other incoming freshmen and explore co-curricular opportunities. Classes begin for students on Monday, August 19.

An opening service and installation of new faculty will take place as part of the first day’s events on August 19 at 10 a.m. in the west gymnasium. Pastor Kelly Huet from St. Andrew Lutheran Church, Middleton, will offer the devotion during this special chapel service. The community is invited to attend. The theme for the 2019-21 school years, “Witness,” is a reminder of Acts 1:8, “You will be my witnesses…to the ends of the earth.” This theme will be a focus in devotions and other events throughout the next two school years.

LLHS Faculty 2019-20
Lakeside Lutheran faculty number 34 for the 2019-20 school year, including back row, from left: Pastor Don Schultz, Assistant Principal, Religion; Andrew Willems, Technology Director, STEM Academy, Computer Science; Todd Hackbarth, Math, Videography, Religion; Eric Dorn, Religion; Jim Buege, Director of Choirs, English; Phil Dretske, Math, Computing, STEM Academy. Second row from top, L-R: Andy Rosenau, Guidance Director, Computing; Nate Sievert, PhyEd, Math; Dorlene Schroeder, Counselor; Hannah Uher, Science; Ruth Hirschfeld, Director of Extended Learning; Tim Matthies, Math; Damon Tracy, Science. Middle row, L-R: Phyllis Huska, Librarian; Darice Brumm, Extended Learning Aide; Justin Vanderhoof, English, Social Studies; Glen Pufahl, Director of Bands, English; Jeff Meske, Career and Technical Education; Matt Doering, Social Studies.  2nd row up, L-R: Cameron Ausen, Social Studies, Religion; Pastor Mike Helwig, Religion; Jenny Krauklis, PhyEd, Math; Erin Koschnitzke, FACS, Health; Nathan Koerber, World Languages; Lori Tetzlaff, Art, Health; Steve Lauber, Director of Admissions, English. Front row, from left: Paul Bauer, Science, Math; Andy Asmus, Social Studies; James Grasby, Principal, Religion; Todd Jahns, Activities Director, PhyEd; Jodie Schommer, English. Missing are Dan Kuehl, Director of Instruction, English; Pastor Mark Toepel, World Languages; Gerry Walta, World Languages.

New full-time faculty to be installed include Mr. Todd Jahns, new Activities Director and varsity boys basketball coach. He previously taught at Wisconsin Lutheran College, Milwaukee. Mr. Eric Dorn, who will teach sophomore religion and coach boys varsity soccer, returned to the U.S. after teaching for a year at St. John’s Lutheran School on the island of Antigua in the West Indies.

Part-time faculty include Mrs. Erin Koschnitzke, who stepped in last spring to teach the Family and Consumer Science classes after teacher Sandi Corlett took leave of absence, will continue these responsibilities for another year. She also coaches the JV2 girls basketball team. Mrs. Dorlene Schroeder is joining the staff as a part-time counselor. With a master’s degree in Guidance and Counseling from UW-Whitewater, she will be available to students for academic counseling, career counseling and personal counseling.

Two staff members will be joining Lakeside full-time. New Grounds Manager Dan Schultz, a 2004 Lakeside grad, has spent the past seven years serving as Parks Supervisor for Dodge County. He also has been an assistant football coach for Lakeside for the past five years. Now full-time in her role at Lakeside, Alumni Relations and Event Coordinator Jessica Meyer was the school secretary at Eastside Lutheran School in Madison, and had been working in the Lakeside development office part-time for the past year.

Along with several new faces this fall, Lakeside Lutheran is adding another course in its STEM Academy—Principles of Engineering. The Academy bases its curriculum on Project Lead the Way, a nationally-recognized pathway for students interested in engineering or biomedical sciences in post-secondary education.

Lakeside Lutheran High School is a four-year high school located in Lake Mills, operated and supported by a federation of 32 congregations affiliated with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the Evangelical Lutheran Synod. For additional information about Lakeside, go to llhs.org or call 920-648-2321 and ask for Principal James Grasby.

Principal’s Pen: Time to Shine

“Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt. Those who are wise will shine like the brightness of the heavens” [Daniel 12:2-3].

Among the final words in the book of Daniel is his statement of faith in the resurrection. His words are a comfort to all who believe in the One who gave his life to give life to all.

Daniel lived in a pagan society. The Babylonians and Persians believed the physical world was inferior. The concept of a physical resurrection was foreign to them.

Among the world’s religions, there is notable disagreement on what happens after death. Christians know and believe that Christ will literally raise us from the dead. We will be physical beings, not clouds or spirits. This makes Christianity distinct.

Our world fights against Christ’s teaching of a physical resurrection. Many non-Christians believe that resurrection from the dead is either ridiculous or unneeded. Recently, one state passed a law allowing “human composition” as a means for disposing of human remains. This method considers the lifeless body to be “soil” that is placed back into the ground. On the surface, this appears harmless. However, behind it is the belief that we are “accidents,” the product of evolution. As such, many see death as nothing more than a natural end. By dying, the human body eternally returns to nature.

Genesis 3 tells us that death is the unnatural consequence of sin. However, Christians also know and believe that Christ destroyed sin and death. Some day, he will raise our bodies without sin and its effects.

There is nothing wrong with traditional ways of handling human remains after death. What matters is what we believe. Even in death, we glorify God. The ground may temporarily hold our remains. But Jesus will return to call us once more to take on flesh and rise to eternal life.

God preserve us all in the one true faith so that one day we will “shine like the brightness of the heavens.

Principal’s Pen: I don’t deserve this

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Someone—feeling that life is unfair—may say or think these words. Christians could also utter them. However, by faith, they convey a completely different meaning.

Jesus and his disciples left Judea for Galilee. Unlike their countrymen, they traveled through Samaria. Eventually, they arrived at Sychar, the location of Jacob’s well. Jesus sent his disciples to town to buy food while he waited at the well.

A Samaritan woman came to draw water. Jesus asked her for a drink. Immediately, her defenses went up. “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” (John 4:9). She knew that Jews did not associate with Samaritans or even share their cups. However, Jesus would not be dissuaded. He said, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water” (v. 10).

water4cThis woman did not realize that the long-awaited Messiah sat before her. After further conversation, Jesus revealed, “I am he” (v. 26). This woman did not deserve this. Jesus could have avoided Samaria. He could have said nothing when she approached the well. He could have ended the conversation after her rebuttal. Yet, by grace, he revealed himself to her as well as to “many of the Samaritans from that town [who] believed in him because of the woman’s testimony” (v. 39).

Those in Sychar did not deserve this. Neither do we.

We are “enemies of God” (Hebrews 10:27) through unbelief. We have “turned from following him and [have] no regard for any of his ways” (Job 34:27). This alone is grounds for God’s rejection.

Yet, by grace, he reveals Christ to us through his Word. Scripture provides the gospel’s “living water” (John 4:10) to identify Jesus as “that Messiah called Christ … [who] will explain everything” (v. 25).

“I don’t deserve this!” No. It should be, “I don’t deserve this”—“the incomparable riches of [God’s] grace, expressed in his kindness to us in Christ Jesus” (Eph 2:7).

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Warrior Band parades award home from Cherry Festival

The Lakeside Lutheran Warrior Band experienced another successful summer, marching in seven Wisconsin and three Michigan parades, and was awarded first place at the National Cherry Royale Parade.

The season culminated with a four-day trip July 3-6 to Traverse City, Michigan, home of the annual National Cherry Festival. While there, the band marched in the Boyne City, Mich., Fourth of July Festival Parade, described by Good Morning America and USA Today as “Top 10 Independence Day Celebrations in the Nation,” according to publicity materials. Later that evening they performed in the exhibition Junior Royale Parade in Traverse City. Saturday morning saw the band perform in the Cherry Royale Parade, in which the Warrior Band scored the highest among all bands, scoring 93/100 points, and took first place in its class. Band members enjoyed the rest of their tour in activities that included river tubing, hiking dunes, laser tag, crossing Lake Michigan on the S.S. Badger ferry and more.

The summer season also included June parades in Wisconsin cities including Brillion, Appleton, Mt. Horeb, Mukwonago, Oregon, Lake Mills and Sun Prairie. Photos from the parades can be viewed and downloaded at llhs.smugmug.com/School/Summer-Band-2019

The Lakeside Lutheran Warrior Band is classified as a “marching” or “parade” band, as opposed to a “show” band that would emphasize field displays. Marching bands such as Lakeside’s incorporate complex choreography performed right on the street during parades. This year’s parade songs included the well-known and challenging “Emperata Overture” by Claude T. Smith and an excerpt from “Chorale and Shaker Dance” by John Zdechlik.

The band is already preparing for its major trip next summer to participate in the Calgary Stampede in Alberta, Canada. The two-week travel schedule historically centers around parades in the Mt. Rushmore area as well as multiple Stampede events, including the kick-off parade on July 3, 2020, where more than 250,000 people fill the 2.5-mile route in downtown Calgary, and also includes several opportunities for band members to experience sights such as the Badlands, Banff National Park and the Columbia Icefield Chalet and Glacier

For more information about the Lakeside Lutheran Warrior Band, contact Director Glen Pufahl at gpufahl@llhs.org or 920-648-2321. The band welcomes interest from serious musicians grades 8-12 from the community as well as from within its own school band program.

Warrior Stories: Hannah Willems

Lakeside has given me the opportunity to express my love for Jesus by using the talents he has given me. Whether that be through song or athletics, Lakeside helped me learn many different things. I have been a three-sport athlete in volleyball, basketball and soccer, as well as a member of the band and A Cappella choir. The atmosphere is lively with so many activities and clubs to participate in that help students stay connected with friends and the Lakeside community.

Relationships built with teachers also make a big impact. One teacher and coach in particular for me was Mrs. Krauklis, my volleyball coach for two years. She always brings out the best in me whether I am on the court or in the classroom, encouraging and supporting and trying to get me to fulfill my potential. I will certainly miss her a ton and definitely will keep in touch if I ever need advice. Another is Mr. Vanderhoof. Although here only a year so far, he already has a huge heart for his students, always checking in to make sure everything is going well and if it’s not, he was there to listen or even get me on the right path. I am so thankful to have come to know these two teachers.

Lakeside has blessed my four years with amazing friendships and awesome memories that I will never forget. I’m fully equipped to move on to my next chapter in life at Martin Luther College and share my love for Jesus through teaching. Thank you so much, Lakeside.

(Left) Hannah, daughter of Andrew and Heidi, is a member at Bethany, Fort Atkinson. In May, she joined the ranks of her Forever Warrior siblings, including Luke (‘17), Aaron (‘12) and Sara (‘11, MLC ‘16). Brother Noah is a Shoreland Lutheran grad (‘15).

(Top right) Coach Krauklis captured a selfie with Hannah and two other senior volleyball players.

(Bottom right) In her second year in A Cappella Choir, Hannah and the choir traveled to 20 area churches as well as to California over spring break to lead in song worship.

Principal’s Pen: Bad news, good news

It’s going to get worse before it gets better.

John authored Revelation while exiled on Patmos. It was a dangerous time for Christians. Most faced persecution. Many were imprisoned. Some were being tortured and killed.

John’s Spirit-inspired book accurately depicted his world. The Christian Church was under attack. It appeared that evil would soon gain the upper hand.

Repeatedly, John urged the saints to be faithful to God during this tribulation.

But, it would get worse before it got better. He cautioned, “Do not be afraid of what you are about to suffer. I tell you, the devil will put some of you in prison to test you, and you will suffer persecution” [Revelation 2:10a]. But, immediately, he exhorted, “Be faithful, even to the point of death, and I will give you life as your victor’s crown” [v.10b]. There was hope. Even if death was imminent, the Lord promised the “victor’s crown” to all who persevered.

The Lord of the Church would not desert the faithful. Eventually, the institutions seeking to destroy Christianity would themselves end. No longer would the saints be persecuted, and the Church would actually become society’s foundation.

Today, Christianity is again under attack. But, unlike John’s time, the attack is not necessarily physical. Today’s attack seeks to undermine the Church through fear and apathy. We feel alone and isolated because Scripture’s views are no longer valued by society. At times, we are lulled into complacency thinking that attacks on Christians are distant, sporadic, and without effect.

In reality, those attacks are drawing closer and intensifying. Christians are identified in politics, the media, and entertainment as intolerant hatemongers. Some view us as the troublers of society for defending Scripture’s truths on life, marriage, and sexuality.

We would all do well to read John’s words and remind ourselves that we, too, live in a perilous age. At the same time, we can find comfort in God’s Word. Even if persecution and death threaten us, God promises, “I will give you life as your victor’s crown.”

May God give us a strong faith to clings to him for he promises us “the victor’s crown.”

Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 or jgrasby@llhs.org