History-making student teacher on campus

This quarter, Lakeside Lutheran is privileged to have student teacher Annalies Brander on campus. Mrs. Hirschfeld is mentoring Miss Brander in the Extended Learning Center this spring. Annalies, who is double majoring in Early Childhood Education and Special Education, is from Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

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She hadn’t considered special education until she worked at a Jesus Cares camp. “It was so rewarding,” she says. “So I started taking all the classes.”

Considering that she is majoring in early childhood education, she was surprised by how much she enjoys working with high schoolers. “I wasn’t fond of high schoolers when I was in high school, so I was terrified when I found out I’d be going to a high school,” she admits.

But the Lakeside students and her experience so far has changed her mind. “It’s going really well,” she says. She enjoys getting to know the students she works with in study hall. I love finding out “how I can best help them and how they can succeed.”

This means “I’ve had to relearn things, like pre-Algebra,” she says. “I also have to learn how to explain things in many different ways. What might make sense to me doesn’t make sense to someone else,” she says. “It’s taught me to be very, very flexible.”

Miss Brander is the first special education student teacher sent out by Martin Luther College and we couldn’t be happier that she is here! Be sure to stop by the ELC and welcome her!

 

Principal’s Pen: Not just an option

“I’m checking out the options.”

Every parochial school administrator has likely heard these words. Parents sometimes become dissatisfied with their child’s current school. When this happens, they explore the options.

However, Christian education is not just an option. It is true education. God gives us two reasons for this.

First, God commands parents to train their children in his Word. He says, “Impress [my commands and promises] on your children” (Deuteronomy 6:7). The psalmist adds, “We will tell the next generation the praiseworthy deeds of the Lord,…which he commanded our ancestors to teach their children…and they in turn would tell their children” (Psalm 78:4-6). Christian education is God’s directive to parents. In addition to what they teach in their homes, many parents use Christian schools to reinforce the message. It is their joy to provide this opportunity for their children.

Psalm 119:105Secondly, God promises to bless his Word. Christian schools employ the Word of God in every possible situation. Students in Christian schools are immersed in Scripture from “bell to bell.” They are continuously exposed to the blessings of God’s Word in school. Isaiah writes, “[My Word] will not return to me empty, but will accomplish what I desire and achieve the purpose for which I sent it” (Isaiah 55:11). Our Savior also attests that his Word is “full of the Spirit and life” (John 6:63).

Most education trains only the mind and body. Christian education also does this by first reaching the heart. God’s Word has the power to effect true change in all learners for now and eternity.

Christian education is not just an option. It is true education.

Mr. Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 x2204 or jgrasby@llhs.org

Warrior FFA hosts 3rd annual banquet

On Tuesday, March 28, the Lakeside Lutheran FFA Chapter held their third annual banquet with 106 people attending. For the 2016-17 school year, the Lakeside FFA grew from 37 members to 46.

Keynote speaker Garry Gard, a grain merchandiser from Didion Grain, spoke to the members, families, and guests about some of the 50 uses of field corn in their homes. He shared that 80,000 bushels of grain are milled in Cambria each day and shipped around the world for use in protein bars, grits, adhesives and ethanol.

The Lakeside FFA Alumni held its second annual live auction where an assortment of bird feeders, clothing, gift baskets and a rocking chair were auctioned. The total profit was $2,000; this year, $1,000 will be returned to senior FFA members who complete a scholarship application and plan to continue their education at tech schools or college.

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Officers for 2017-2018 Lakeside Lutheran FFA chapter were announced at the third annual Lakeside Lutheran FFA banquet: (standing, from left) Caitlin Condon, Cole Schuster, Matthew Gunst, Emily Meske, Benjamin Huebner, Jeremy Nehls, Connor Dobson, Emily Weber.

Members received a variety of membership awards. Four-year member seniors include Brett Cichanofsky, Haley Kooiman, Mindy Meske, Hailey Stade and Nick Voigt. Stars Over the Chapter are Star Greenhand: Cole Schuster; Most Active Sophomore: Emily Meske; Most Active Junior: Jeremy Nehls; Star in Placement: Brett Cichanofsky; and Star FFA Member and Dekalb Agriculture Award: Nick Voigt.

Retiring officers received a laser engraved plaque. Proficiency winners were recognized based on their supervised agricultural experiences (paid and unpaid hours along with entrepreneurship investment). Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) winners were: Sheep: Nick Voigt; Equine (placement and entrepreneur): Melissa Melcher; Dairy Placement: Jeremy Nehls; Dairy Entrepreneurship: Karleen Battist; Food Service: Emily Meske; Goat Production: Tyler Degner; Poultry: Savannah Steffen; and Specialty Animal (bee hive): Benjamin Huebner. Many members were also awarded for their participation in speaking contests, career development events (judging), and top sales in the fruit sale.

The Warrior FFA also gave out three key awards to adults who partnered with the chapter. Steve Duwe was bestowed the Honorary FFA Degree, Kevin and Amy Voigt were awarded the Blue and Gold FFA Alumni award, and Cody Aiken was recognized as the Friend of Lakeside FFA in helping with the second annual corn test plot.

Warrior forensics advances to state, hosts open house

The Lakeside Lutheran High School forensics team earned top scores in district competition March 16 at Belleville High School as each of the 25 entries from Lakeside earned advancement to the Wisconsin High School Forensics Association (WHSFA) State Speech Festival at UW–Madison April 21. There the Lakeside team will look to capture its 8th consecutive Excellence in Speech Award, given when a team places in the top five percent of more than 350 high school forensics teams that compete in Wisconsin. In preparation, the team is hosting a “Family & Friends” performance night at the school on Wednesday, April 19, from 6-8 PM.

Within 14 districts across the state, WHSFA District competition scoring involves forensic entries being evaluated by three different judges. To qualify for the state festival, two of the three scores for an entry must be a minimum 20 points; the 25 entries of the Warrior forensics team were all awarded at least 20 points on each of their 75 scores. Lakeside Lutheran students are among over 7,000 Wisconsin high school students that compete in individual and group categories that include Demonstration, Informative or Extemporaneous Speech, Public Address, Moments in History, Special Occasion Speaking, Radio Announcing, Poetry, Prose or Literature Interpretation, Farrago, Play Acting and Story Telling.

In preparation for competition and to provide a night of entertainment for its supporters, the team is hosting a free night of oratory performance. All fans and families are invited to the school on Wednesday, April 19 from 6-8 PM to choose 12 performances from among 24 offerings, presented in two rounds of 50 minutes each in various rooms on campus. The presentations will include most of the categories heard at WHSFA.

Warrior Forensics headed to state
Whether it be through telling a children’s story, reliving a moment from history, tackling a contemporary American problem, making an audience laugh or demonstrating a certain skill, these participants are not only competing on a talented team, they are also sharpening one of the greatest tools in today’s world: the skill of public speaking. The Lakeside Lutheran forensics team includes Front, L-R: Emily Raymond, Sun Prairie; Madelaine Triebold, Oconomowoc; Maddie McKenna, Lake Mills;.Lillie Johnstone, Jefferson; Mindy Meske, Jefferson; Mira Parker, DeForest; Bronte Perkins, Madison. 2nd row, L-R: Ashley McLain, Juneau; Caleb Strutz, Verona; Kyle Burger, Lake Mills; Jacob Horta, Helenville; Emma Statz, Helenville; Violet Dumke, Verona; Abbie DiGiovanni, Fort Atkinson. 3rd row: Emma Hans, Jefferson; Samantha Anderson, Sun Prairie; Kayla Grundman, Waterloo; Justin Learned, Watertown; Caleb Raymond, Sun Prairie; Kaitlyn Gehler, Waterloo; Derek Gulrud, Marshall. 4th row: Matt Gunst, Hartford; Emma Guld, Lake Mills; Maria Werre, Sun Prairie; Tina Kehl, Waterloo; Devon Perkins, Madison; Morgan Thiele, Poynette; Jenna Gaal, Oconomowoc. Top row: Coach Steve Lauber; Malachi Mortensen, Beaver Dam; Charlie Pingel, Sun Prairie. Missing from photo are Sophie Griffin, Lodi; Cannon Kerr, Watertown; Max Thiele, Oconomowoc; Emily Weber, Helenville.

 

Principal’s Pen: Seeing Absolutely

vision_7600cIt’s said that beauty is in the “eye of the beholder.” Since one’s view is relative, what he considers beautiful, good, or right is often his opinion.

This is the world’s thinking. It believes that beauty or right are found in anything if it doesn’t undermine something else. There are no absolutes. After all, it’s in the “eye of the beholder.”

Christians know and follow the absolutes of God’s Word. They know relative truth is wrong. When they express God’s unchanging views, the world labels them and their words as judgmental, cliquey, or intolerant. The world tells them that right and wrong vary by location, time, and situation. After all, it’s in the “eye of the beholder.”

Before his crucifixion, Jesus prepared his disciples for his death. He said, “Very truly I tell you, you will weep and mourn while the world rejoices” (John 16:20).

Indeed, the world would celebrate Jesus’ death. His teachings countered the prevailing thoughts of his day. His foes would not accept or tolerate what he identified as sinful. Therefore, they viewed his arrest, torture, and murder as the right thing. To them, “he had no beauty or majesty” (Isaiah 53:2). To them, he was wrong.

But, Jesus pointed his disciples past that dark time when their “grief [would] turn to joy” (John 16:20). His death produced life when he victoriously rose. Joy would come to all who behold him as their Savior by faith.

Are things really in the “eye of the beholder?” Certainly, views on earthly matters are sometimes relative since the beholder determines their value.

However, Christians view all things by faith through God’s Word. Right and wrong are absolutes. Through Christ, our eyes behold the truth. Through Christ, we see light, life, and salvation.

Mr. Jim Grasby is principal of Lakeside Lutheran.
Reach him at 920.648.2321 x2204 or jgrasby@llhs.org

2017 Badger State reps are announced

Lakeside Lutheran High School has announced its 2017 Badger Boys and Girls State representatives. The boys selected to represent Lakeside Lutheran at the 76th session of Badger Boys State at Ripon College from June 10-17 are James Neuberger, son of Dan and Dawn Neuberger, Lake Mills, and Matthias Winters, son of Jim and Kimara Winters, Watertown. The girls representing Lakeside Lutheran at the 74th session of Badger Girls State at UW-Oshkosh from June 18-23 are Emma Guld, daughter of John and Nicole Guld, Lake Mills, and Emily Raymond, daughter of Kyle and Amy Raymond, Sun Prairie. All of this year’s nominees are members of the Lakeside Lutheran Chapter of the National Honor Society.

2017 LLHS Badger State reps photo
Lakeside Lutheran has chosen its representatives for the 2017 Badger Boys and Girls State Conferences in June. The reps for the class of 2018, pictured L-R, are Emily Raymond, Matthias Winters, James Neuberger and Emma Guld.

Ranked first academically in his class of 2018, James Neuberger has been part of the math team for three years, the Academic Bowl for two, and sings with the school’s traveling A Cappella Choir. He has participated in cross country, basketball, track and soccer. A member at St. Paul, Lake Mills, he is part of Teens for Christ, participating in school and community service projects throughout the school year. With perfect attendance and no tardies for all three years, he is planning to study for a degree in Pharmacy. “It’s an honor to be selected for Badger Boys State,” says Neuberger. “I appreciate that my efforts in the classroom have been recognized by teachers and administrators. Badger Boys State will give me the opportunity to find out more about myself and what I’m capable of accomplishing in the near future. Outside of school activities, he also works for the City of Lake Mills Parks Department. When asked what he was most looking forward to learning or experiencing at BBS, Neuberger replied, “I’m looking forward to further development of my leadership skills and a better understanding of the government process.”

Matthias Winters, ranked 6th in his class, has served as the class vice president for three years. He participates in concert band, jazz band, marching band, and A Cappella Choir. He has received two state first place medals at WSMA for piano and two outstanding musician awards for trombone. In addition, he participates on the math team and in the Academic Bowl, is the charter president of the Lakeside Lutheran STEM Club and writes for the student newspaper. For sports, he has participated in three years of football, two years of basketball, and one of baseball and two in track. A member at St. Luke, Watertown, Winters is part of the youth group, church band, and co-ed softball at church, and serves as an usher. He will also participate in OperationGo, the school summer mission trip program. He works as a cart-pusher at Walmart in Watertown. Winters plans to major in Industrial Engineering and minor in business at Milwaukee School of Engineering, while also doing the Reserve Officers Training Corps. He sees the opportunity to attend Badger State, “as an honor and a great opportunity to meet lots of kids who all have a bright future. This selection shows me that my teachers think highly of me and I can’t take that for granted,” he said. He is most looking forward to experiencing the elections. “I think it will be fun trying to run for the different offices.”

Emma Guld has participated in math meets, Academic Bowl, Forensics, Teens for Christ, and the school drama production each year. She participated in cross country, basketball, and band for two years. This year, she is part of FFA and STEM Club. Emma volunteers for the National Academy of Television and Sciences, and received two Emmy awards at Chicago Midwest Emmys for work on “Into The Outdoors.” Ranked 2nd in the class, she is considering becoming a dentist and eventually an orthodontist. Currently, she has a part-time job at the afterschool care program at St. Paul, Lake Mills, where she is a member. “I think that Badger Girls State will be a fantastic opportunity to learn from other people who have leadership roles in Wisconsin,” she says, and is “most looking forward to learning more about leadership with other girls that share a lot of the same interests that I do.”

Emily Raymond, a self-proclaimed “hard worker,” proves her claim. A member of the state championship forensics team, drama, and Teens for Christ for three years, she has also participated in track for two years and volleyball for one. She is making her second trip with OperationGo this summer. In service to the community, she has organized a book drive for a hospital clinic, volunteered at Second Harvest Food Bank, participated in Operation Christmas Child, been a “buddy” at the “Night to Shine” prom for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, organized a food drive for local food pantries, and caroled at Bethesda group and Willowbrook nursing homes. At her church, Peace in Sun Prairie, she teaches VBS, serves meals, helps with Advent by Candlelight, and is a member of the Youth Group. Working as a cashier in Sun Prairie, she plans to attend Martin Luther College in New Ulm, MN, to pursue a double major in elementary and special education. “It is a great honor to be chosen for BGS. I love to try new things, and this is not like anything I have ever tried before,” she says. “I am really looking forward to meeting other girls from all over Wisconsin! I am also excited to learn how to be a better leader. (I’ve heard that the food at BGS is pretty good too.)”

Badger State Government and Leadership Conferences are an opportunity for students entering their senior year of high school to put the principles of democratic government into action during a weeklong assembly. Sponsored by the Wisconsin American Legion and its Auxiliary, the goals of Badger State assemblies are to prepare young men and women of high school age for citizenship in a modern world, teach principles of democracy, instill a love of country and desire to preserve our government. Schools are encouraged to select representatives based on a combination of interest shown, leadership qualities, character, fitness, scholarship and extra-curricular activities.

Warrior musicians qualify for State Music Festival

Sixteen Class A entries from Lakeside Lutheran High School earned a starred first rating at the district level of the Wisconsin State Music Association (WSMA) Solo-Ensemble Festival. Starred first ratings in Class A, the highest level of music selection, qualify the musicians to perform at the WSMA State Festival at UW-Whitewater April 29.

Two large ensembles were among those advancing to the state festival, including the Lakeside Lutheran Percussion Ensemble and the Swing Choir. Two solos in piano, four vocal solos, as well as an F horn, an alto sax, a flute and a marimba solo advance. Three piano duets and a piano trio also earned a trip to state.

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The Lakeside Lutheran Swing Choir also qualified for state. The choir includes back row from left, Maddie McKenna, Lake Mills; Mindy Meske, Jefferson; Jenna Gaal, Lake Mills; Jade Wood, Madison; Emma Guld, Lake Mills, Sophia Collins, Lake Mills; Maria Werre, Sun Prairie; Emily Weber, Helenville. Front, from left is Jacob Meyer, Sun Prairie; Derek Gulrud, Marshall; Skyler Christianson, Janesville; Luke Willems, Johnson Creek; Philip Treptow, Avalon; Noah Lorenz, Watertown; Andrew Burk, Johnson Creek; Kyle Burger, Lake Mills.
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The solo, duet and trio state qualifiers from Lakeside Lutheran are back row, L-R: Griffin Torgerson, Watertown (piano duet, piano trio); Alyson Steffan, Lake Mills (vocal solo), Ashley Fritz, Middleton (Sax solo); Sophia Collins, Lake Mills (marimba solo); Matthias Winters, Watertown (piano duet, piano trio). Middle row, L-R: Cara McElroy, Madison (flute solo); Samantha Anderson, Sun Prairie (vocal solo); Maria Werre, Sun Prairie (2 vocal solos); Jamee Wohling, Beaver Dam (piano duet); Violet Dumke, Verona (piano duet). Front row, L-R: Fai Haw, Lake Mills (French horn solo); Tina Kehl, Waterloo (piano duet); Samantha Kohls, Waterloo (piano solo, piano trio); Riley Schulz, Fort Atkinson (piano duet).
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The Lakeside Lutheran Percussion Ensemble qualified for the WSMA state festival. Members of the ensemble include back row, L-R: Mitchell Doyle, Watertown; Jonah Rupnow, Watertown; Ryan Preskar, Juneau; Benjamin Ertman, Fort Atkinson. Middle row, L-R: Trevor Geerdts, Windsor; Cody Gumz, Marshall; Aaron Natvig, Cottage Grove; J Doyle, DeForest; Annika Butzow, Janesville. Front row, L-R: Rachel Mayer, Fort Atkinson; Cara McElroy, Madison; Sophia Collins, Lake Mills; Jamee Wohling, Beaver Dam. Missing from photo are Javin Hollis and Justin Learned.

In addition to the 16 starred first entries, Lakeside Class A musicians were awarded four first ratings and 14 seconds, for a total of 34 Class A performances. In class B, Lakeside Lutheran had 18 entries. Of those, seven earned a first place rating and 11 earned a second rating. Four of the seven Class C entries from Lakeside earned a first rating while three received a second.

Overall, Lakeside had 59 solo or ensemble entries that involved more than 75 students. Poynette High School and Luther Prep School were the 2017 sites that hosted more than 650 entries from among 11 Capitol North Conference middle and high schools in late February.